His Margaret’s voice, recorded


I like to think that people wake up when someone thinks of them. I believe the human soul continues to exist after this life, and that we can speak to those no longer with us, just by thinking of them.


Mine is more a scientific belief than a spiritual one, perhaps because I find it impossible to contemplate nothing after this life. But the continued life of the human soul can be explained in scientific terms, or by a writer:

The simplest analogy I use is that of the TV set: When it’s not in use, it sits in whichever room it’s placed, and does very little besides be there. Switch it on and it comes to life, as it picks up signals and plays them. The human body is just same, doing not very much when we’re sleeping, but animated by the life within us. The body is the TV, and the soul is the broadcast. When the television is switched off, the various TV networks are still broadcasting, but we can’t see the programmes. When we die and our physical bodies give up, I believe we carry on thinking. I believe that life as we know it, is one part of an ongoing existence, the greatness of which we can’t yet comprehend.

I use the simple quantum paths analogy to further enlighten (or confuse): Imagine you’re walking a path, and you reach a point where it splits in two. You choose one path and walk down it. Does the other path (the one you didn’t choose) still exist?

The quantum universe is no longer theoretical. At the quantum level, things exist in two potential states simultaneously, only taking their final form in a catalyst reaction, which could be as simple as the act of observation (Schrödinger’s Cat is a good demonstration of this as a thought experiment). Quantum computers are almost infinitely more powerful than conventional machines, because each bit of data (every 1 or 0, ‘On’ or ‘Off’ switch) exists in both states at the same time. When either is called into existence by a computing operation, the one which didn’t, continues to exist, allowing for previously impossible calculations to be made.

Our daily lives operate at a quantum level too, with each decision we make (millions every day) calling one of many possibilities into existence. All of the others (the actions we didn’t take) remain. It’s a mind-boggling thought, but every second of every day, we each bring almost infinite numbers of alternative universes into existence. The only one we’re aware of, is the one we’re in.

So when we die, there’s an exact point where we are both alive and dead. In the latter, the physical body has expired and can no longer transport and express our inner soul. It’s therefore quite logical to conclude, that if our consciousness remains (just as it did in dreams when we slept in the previous life), it will continue to bear witness to the universe in which it still exists. The other universes continue, and are lived by those mourning (or celebrating) your passing, while you’re free of that body they’re about to burn, bury or transform in a more imaginative way (I’d quite like my ashes fired into space, if anyone’s offering).

Free of physical form, and without the needs our bodies have; for want of a better word, we become spirits, like a mist, a cloud, or indeed a ghost. Lucid dreaming has taught me how to travel the dream scape in a subconscious way, and the life after this one is much the same.

These are my beliefs. They’re not religious, but they have the same scientific grounding as some scripture. Until I experience it for myself, I lack conclusive proof, by my lucid travelling in dreams has given me a faith that death will be one long dream of total freedom.

I do get the feeling that other people are around when I think of them. It’s like they’ve heard me thinking. It would be like a non-believer unable to accept the freedom of their new life, so choosing to sleep instead, but woken by that same calling. Specifically, I often have commune with my auntie Margaret.

Margaret was my mum’s older sister, and she died when she was 51 (of cancer). I didn’t appreciate her as much as I should in life, because I was still a teenager when she went. But I remember weekly visits to nan’s (Margaret lived with nan) back in the early days of home VCRs, and my auntie would rent me an age-inappropriate video nasty to watch in the corner. Sometimes she’d covertly watch the finale of a film before I arrived, letting me know how good (gory) it was, in a sort of pre-approved service (but never spoilers). She saw the bored teenager, and she could relate. I wish she could’ve met my kids, which is why I talk to them about her sometimes.

I felt my auntie was around when I was writing Cyrus Song, guiding me on the science bits (there’s a bit of quantum jiggery pokery in the book, all explained and made plausible), and that’s why the book was dedicated to her (and Douglas Adams).

Cyrus Song is free to keep on World Book Day tomorrow, and it’s a book of many voices, not just my own. It’s the animals and the plants as well; it’s all of the life on this planet we share, and it’s nature’s chorus. My auntie Margaret is one of the voices in the choir, backed by the hidden orchestra.

I can’t offer a money back guarantee on the book, as it’s free. I’m asking for my voice to be heard in an investment of time by others. I’m asking readers to take a leap of faith. As well as being confident that anyone who reads the book will see a perfectly plausible answer to life, I can offer a further guarantee that it will be time well spent:

If you’re one of those who’s tempted to sneak a peek at the end of a book, you can do that with Cyrus Song, without fear of spoilers. It would take a part of the fun away, but anyone who reads the very last page will be intrigued to find out how that happened.

In finishing, a note on Twitter: Last night I tweeted that Cyrus Song is free on World Book Day (tomorrow). Afterwards, a few people went and bought copies. On Facebook, I might put this down to something else, but on Twitter, I put that down to human kindness. There’s a donate button (Buy me a coffee) on this blog, if anyone has guilt issues, getting something I spent nine months on for free.

I hope my Auntie Margaret (and Douglas Adams) enjoy tomorrow, when they’ll hear the voices of others’ thoughts.

Cyrus Song is only free tomorrow, for World Book Day. I gave the world a chance to see, and the world had one chance to take it.


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